Additional GIS faculty workshop added – register now for funded seats

Three GIS workshops for faculty will be offered during Summer 2011.

Introductory GIS workshop (3 days) – NEW
Wednesday, June 1st through Friday, June 3rd from 9am-2pm
(lunch provided)

Introductory GIS workshop (4 days)
Monday, August 8th through Thursday, August 11th from 9am-1pm
(lunch provided)

Advanced GIS workshop (2 days)
Monday, August 15th through Tuesday, August 16th
(lunch provided)

These grant supported workshops ($400 for each participant) will enable 12 faculty to engage in a hands-on GIS experience designed to be broadly useful to faculty, regardless of their specific disciplines and areas of research. To make the workshop experience more meaningful and relevant, both the introductory and advanced workshops will feature local data and topics of interest

If you are interested in participating, please click the link below to complete the GIS workshop interest form. Please note – there is a limit of 12 funded seats for the Summer 2011 GIS Workshops. Additional Mellon funded GIS workshop opportunities will be announced prior to summer 2012 and 2013 sessions.

Click here to access GIS workshop interest form.

Go Philly! GIS helps improve access to healthy food in the city

Yesterday’s NY Times had an opinion piece praising Philadelphia’s efforts in recent years to improve access to healthy food for its most disadvantaged neighborhoods and citizens.  In ‘Go Philly!’, Mark Bittman describes the collaborative efforts of Philadelphia municipal government, the Commonwealth of PA and a whole host of local non-profits (including my former employer, the newly renamed  Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition) in developing programs to bring supermarkets and healthy food options to under-served neighborhoods.

What he doesn’t describe is the critical role that GIS has played in bringing these programs to life.  See below for some background information and resources related to using GIS for improving access to healthy food.

1. Watch this short video (Ch. 3 of Episode 2 from Penn State’s Geospatial Revolution video series) to learn more about the role of GIS in Philadelphia’s ‘healthy food’ success story.

2. Read reports from the Food Trust and The Reinvestment Fund (TRF) describing their work in Philadelphia and other communities. Both organizations are Philadelphia-based non-profits that have been at the center of Philadelphia’s efforts to improve access to healthy food.

“The Grocery Gap: Who Has Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters” – click here

Food Trust/TRF Report on the Fresh Food Financing Initiatives projects – click here

TRF’s resource page on food access – click here

Sample map from Food Trust/TRF report on the Fresh Food Financing Initiative:

“Map 1: Residence of ShopRite Employees by Poverty Rate of Census Tract.  Each star on the map represents a Brown’s ShopRite store, with the location of the store’s employees illustrated by correspondingly colored dots.”

 

3. Watch a video created by TRF in collaboration with the Brookings Foundation to describe their use of GIS and findings in their  “Getting to Market” report on healthy foods initiatives across the U.S.

 

and/or explore the project website for “Getting to Market” – click here . The project site includes profiles of food access in major U.S. metropolitan areas.

 

4. Explore interactive web mapping applications featuring data on supermarket access:

ESRI’s ArcGIS Online Supermarket Access Map – click here

TRF’s PolicyMap Data on Supermarket Access – click here

 

Sample map from ESRI’s Supermarket Access Map:

 

Sample maps from TRF’s PolicyMap application:

 

Details on $520K Mellon grant for environmental studies, GIS integration

I posted a few weeks ago about the $520K grant awarded to Bucknell by the Mellon Foundation. Here are some additional details on how the grant money will be used to strengthen environmental studies and GIS integration across the university. From the Library & IT Matters newsletter:

  • Up to twelve faculty members will receive $400 to participate in either a 4-day (intro) or 2-day (advanced) summer GIS workshop. Click here for more details on the intro and advanced workshops.
  • Faculty members may submit requests to receive up to $1,000 to revise a course to include GIS ($5,000 total)
  • Four student researchers will be provided with summer research funding to conduct research projects involving GIS technology
  • Funds will be available to support consultants and student workers to create new maps or to develop new datasets for use by faculty in integrating GIS for their curriculum and courses
  • Additionally we have support to help with the acquisition of data which can only be obtained through purchasing data sets or through membership in consortia which provide access to proprietary datasets

Contact me by e-mail at janine.glathar@bucknell.edu or by phone at x. 1990 if you are interested in any of the options listed above.

Call for faculty participation in LIT and Mellon-funded summer GIS workshops

Call for faculty participation in LIT and Mellon funded summer GIS Workshops

Two GIS workshops for faculty will be offered during Summer 2011.
* Introductory GIS workshop (4 days)
Monday, August 8th through Thursday, August 11th from 9am-1pm*
(lunch provided)

* Advanced GIS workshop (2 days)
Monday, August 15th through Tuesday, August 16th*
(lunch provided)

*Additional workshop dates (e.g. end of May/early June) may be added depending on faculty interest. If you are interested in attending, but can’t join us during the August workshop dates, please click on the link below to suggest alternate dates.

These grant supported workshops ($400 for each participant) will enable 12 faculty to engage in a hands-on GIS experience designed to be broadly useful to faculty, regardless of their specific disciplines and areas of research. To make the workshop experience more meaningful and relevant, both the introductory and advanced workshops will feature local data and topics of interest

If you are interested in participating, please click the link below to complete the GIS workshop interest form. Please note – there is a limit of 12 funded seats for the Summer 2011 GIS Workshops. Additional Mellon funded GIS workshop opportunities will be announced prior to summer 2012 and 2013 sessions.

Click here to access GIS workshop interest form.

TNC Presentation on Marcellus Shale – Monday, April 4 @ 4:30pm

What: Presentation by The Nature Conservancy on Marcellus Shale/PA Energy Impacts
When: Monday, April 4th at 4:30pm
Where: Bertrand Library, Traditional Reading Room

Refreshments will be served.

Come and hear Tamara Gagnolet, GIS Analyst and Conservation Data Manager for the Pennsylvania chapter of the Nature Conservancy, discuss her work in using GIS to analyze potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania. Ms. Gagnolet’s presentation will focus on how GIS and spatial analysis were used to project how much energy might be developed in PA during the next 20 years, where that development is more or less likely to occur and what types of strategies might need to be employed to mitigate potential habitat impacts.

Students are welcome and encouraged to attend.

ChesapeakeView

Maurie Kelly and her team at PASDA (part of the Penn State Institute of Energy and the Environment) have just released ChesapeakeView, a website that provides free access to remotely sensed data about the Chesapeake Bay region. The website currently holds 263 datasets related to the Chesapeake Bay region – including remotely sensed data as well as habitat, land use, biodiversity, wildlife distribution, historical aerial photos, agricultural imagery, digital coastline images and other types of environmental data related to the region.

“No simple place existed to find remote sensing information about land use, habitat changes and biodiversity,” said Maurie Caitlin Kelly, director of informatics, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment. “Researchers could spend days searching to find whatever data might be available.”

The data interface for ChesapeakeView will look familiar to anyone who has used PASDA’s website.  There are options for downloading the data via FTP, using an internet based data viewer/map tool or streaming it directly into your ArcMap session. ChesapeakeView is part of the AmericaView initiative.

Libya crisis map

Click here to check out the new Libya Crisis Map.  Courtesy of Adena Schutzberg over at AllPointsBlog:

OCHA, UNOSAT and NetHope have been collaborating with the Volunteer Technical Community (VTC) specifically CrisisMappers, Crisis Commons, Open Street Map, and the Google Crisis Response Team over the past week.

The CrisisMappers Standby Task Force has been undertaking a mapping of social media, news reports and official situation reports from within Libya and along the borders at the request of OCHA. The Task Force is also aiding in the collection and mapping of 3W information for the response. UNOSAT is kindly hosting the Common Operational Datasets to be used during the emergency. Interaction with these groups is being coordinated by OCHA’s Information Services Section.

The public version of this map does not include personal identifiers and does not include descriptions for the reports mapped. This restriction is for security reasons. All information included on this map is derived from information that is already publicly available online

 

Penn State releases episode 3 of “Geospatial Revolution” series

A new episode of Penn State’s “Geospatial Revolution” project was released today.  With the tagline “the location of anything is becoming everything” the Geospatial Revolution series is produced by Penn State’s public broadcasting group and described as an “an integrated public service media and outreach initiative about the world of digital mapping and how it is changing the way we think, behave, and interact.”  The new episode – part 3 in a 4 part series – focuses on using GIS for public safety and military/defense purposes. Episode 4 is due out on May 1, 2011. See below for the full-length videos for episodes 1, 2 and 3.  Videos are also available for individual chapters within each episode.

Episode 1:

  • Chapter 1 –  Welcome to the Geospatial Revolution
  • Chapter 2-  A look at what GPS is and how it works
  • Chapter 3 – A timeline of mapping and geospatial technology from stones to phones, including mobile technologies
  • Chapter 4 – A look at how crisis mapping and global crowd-sourcing was critical to aid and rescue during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

Episode 2:

  • Chapter 1 – Creating an interactive city
  • Chapter 2 – Powering business
  • Chapter 3 – Finding a healthy future

Episode 3:

  • Chapter 1 – Mapping the road to peace
  • Chapter 2 – Waging modern war
  • Chapter 3 – Serving and protecting
  • Chapter 4 – Staying safe

Bucknell student uses ArcGIS in research on sleeping sickness

Below is an interview with Daniel Dougherty ’12, a History and Geography major, discussing his use of GIS for an analysis of the impact of climate change on sleeping sickness.  The research project was conducted as part of Prof. Duane Griffin’s Geography 204 course Applied GIS. In the interview, Dougherty describes the data and methodology he used for the project and talks about some of the conclusions he drew from his analysis.

The images below show some of the maps Dougherty was able to produce using ArcGIS, MaxEnt and data from WorldClim.

How big is it really?

Back in December I posted about an NPR story about map scale.  I got so excited about the baseball on the moon map that I neglected to point out the other really interesting link from the story – to the BBC Dimensions website.  Dimensions (or, ‘howbigisitreally’) has a tool that lets you plug in any zip code or location and then choose from a list of events, places or things that you want to superimpose onto your area. See below for a map showing the area that the Guantanamo Bay Naval base would occupy if it was located in Lewisburg. I’ve also included maps showing what the ancient walls of Athens and the Gulf oil spill would look like if superimposed over the Lewisburg area. The Dimensions website has numerous places, events and things to choose from in making your map, including: the war on terror, ancient worlds, the industrial age, space, environmental disasters, depths, cities in history and more.